The Voyage of Huck and His Runaway Slave Companion Jim on the Search for Freedom in Tag Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry FinnThe Voyage of Huck and His Runaway Slave Companion Jim on the Search for Freedom in Tag Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

The Trip of Huck and His Runaway Slave Companion Jim on the Search for Freedom in Tag Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn follows a teenager Southerner, Huck, and his runaway slave companion, Jim, on the search for freedom. Twain intricately interweaves the conflicts of these characters, causing one to rely upon the other to accomplish liberation. Huck seeks to get away from the moral decadence of antebellum world, whereas Jim, seeks liberation from the confining aspect of slavery. Twain’s elaborate plot enables him to thoroughly explore Jim’s character, applying his fictitious theories to satirize arranged religion, and his moral uprightness to exploit the kinks in slavery. Twain’s ardent skepticism of spiritual practices bleeds through the entire early chapters of his novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. He uses Jim’s blind faith in superstition to parallel those that possess a very similar faith in organized religious beliefs. Twain challenges this faith throughout his text message. In the first chapters of the novel, Jim warns Huck that fiddling with lifeless snake pores and skin will conjure misfortune. Jim in the future warns that he'd prefer to “start to see the new moon over his still left shoulder,” which would presumably yield a lot more calamitous results than acquiring “up a snake-skin in his hands” (Twain 53). Twain contests this superstition with Huck’s newfound fortune. Huck boastfully proclaims, “Very well, here’s your misfortune! We’ve ranked in all this pickup truck and eight dollars” (Twain 52). Huck’s tangible good fortune evidently trumps Jim’s intangible beliefs, yet Jim remains to be dogmatic. Twain uses Jim to symbolize overly pious religious fans, who remain adamant within their faith just for the comfort it offers. Comparably,

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